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There are hat-people and no-hat-people. However sad it can be, truth is that hats just don’t  become everybody, but, in my opinion, those happy few who really wear hats well have kind of the moral duty to do it: any kind of hat, from classical fedora to the most innovative and (why not) kinky designs, comes rain or comes shine, hats really make the difference in an outfit (accessories usually do).

Now, Borsalino and all the traditional milliners made my days (and my outfits) with their ever lasting traditional models (and so did Miuccia who designed my ostrich fedoras, which I chose in red and lime green and still cause people to turn to look at them when they cross me in the street), but this time I really wanted to propose you some new milliners, somebody who did hats with a twist and I admit I looked for a long time before completing this selection of mad hatters for you to choose among. To be honest, some of them really convinced me, some of them not quite so much, but I will definitely keep on monitoring the sector in pursuit of some Mavericks.

First one I bumped into and I fancied is the Italian Altalen. What I liked of Altalen is that these guys really think out of the box and – what’s more – they rediscovered the turban, which is definitely one of the most elegant pieces of clothing a woman could wear. 

Altalen

 

They use basically any kind of material and manufacture some really innovative designs and yet their hats never fail to be becoming, that is to say that you don’t look like kind of a pathetic freak sacrificing yourself and your dignity on the altar of extreme fashion, if you know what I mean. Definitely it is worth a visit. In Milan, no. 21 Via Benvenuto Cellini (http://www.altalen.it/).

Jess Collett’s models (http://www.jesscollettmilliner.com/) are not particularly extreme, but her selection of colours and materials make them vibrant and cheerful, something to wear on a foggy day. I personally loved the teal colour and Hermes model with side wings not to mention the Monogram that comes with wings AND your initial on the brim. I was considering buying the Hermes for myself actually (going back to fashion freaks, sometimes I’m really impressed by my own self confidence ๐Ÿ˜‰).  And I literally fell in love with Gabriela Ligenza’s 3D Printed hats (http://www.gabrielaligenza.com/). Her intuition of using such a versatile tool as a 3D printer to realise models that would be otherwise impossible to put together is just amazing. Can you imagine going to a wedding wearing your favourite poem? That’s it, but she also makes amazing models taken from nature or futuristic revisitations of ancient headgears. She also offers a more traditional collection very classy, particularly when it comes to fur hats. Highly recommended. 

Now, let’s speak about men’s hats and Nick Fouquet (http://www.nickfouquet.com/). The kid is handsome and full of creativity, his production sports tenths of different designs, most of which would rather suit an old west gambler than a gentleman (here, again, I don’t know many people who would wear those hats well, but those who do would be gorgeous in Fouquet’s pieces), but his summer straw collection is handmade with the finest quality straw (the kid bothered travelling personally to South America in pursuit of the the best materials and techniques) and draws together classical style and a certain flair for oddities. Not bad.

At last, considering that we got to straw hats, ladies may easily find a model that suits them (and possibly even a hand woven straw bag to go with it) at Sensi Studio (https://sensistudio.com/app/index.php). Bright, simple, colourful handmade straw hats with a Caribbean flair, Stephany Sensi’s hats and bags (along with the embroidered dresses of her recent ready to wear collection) are very evocative of sun and summer and white sand beaches… Something to pack up before heading to St. Barth.

Well…maybe in 6 months or so? ๐Ÿ˜ฌ